Competitive Dance ?

 

 

Competitive dance is a popular, widespread activity in which competitors perform dances in any of several permitted type of dance. The competitive dance industry largely consists of competition production companies—also sometimes called dance competition companies—that conduct regional competitions at stops along their annual, nationwide tours. Dancers who compete at these regional competitions are students ranging in age from approximately four to eighteen years old. Advanced dancers may be chosen to compete solos, duets, trios, or in a small group dance in addition to or in place of large group routines. Competitions typically begin in January and end in June.

 

 

Regional Competitions

Regional competitions are held at high school auditoriums or other performance venues that include a stage and space for judges and audience. Such venues are typically rented for periods ranging from one to four consecutive days, depending on the number of dancers scheduled to compete.

 

National Competitions

National competitions typically take place in major metropolitan areas in large, rented spaces such as hotel conference rooms or convention centers, with portable stages, sound and lighting systems installed just for the competition event.

  • Dance classes and workshops. At some competitions, these classes are adjudicated to produce partial scores for title contenders.

  • A dance-off or dance-down.

  • Choreography workshop for title contenders.

  • End-of-the-week banquet. If the title contenders participated in a choreography workshop, they typically perform the dance at this banquet.

 

Award Winning

Dancers celebrate their accomplishments at the end of an awards ceremony. Some competition production companies encourage celebrations like this, while others prefer dancers to take a more introspective approach to the competition results. A dance routine may receive an individual award based on its final score, or based on its ranking in a particular category, depending on the competition. Some competitions issue individual awards for every routine while others present awards only for the highest overall scoring routines at a competition. Top scoring routines are sometimes awarded prize money and/or scholarships for dance education. These routines may also be eligible to advance to a higher level competition.

 

 

Awards are usually issued in the form of trophies and plaques or, less frequently, as medals. Awards nomenclature varies considerably among competitions, although most awards systems have a value theme involving precious metals or gemstones. For example, at some competitions a routine might receive a bronze, silver, gold or platinum award, while at another competition one might receive an emerald, ruby or diamond award. In addition to variations in nomenclature, there are differences insofar as the number of points required for each award. For example, a gold award might require 270 points at one competition and 280 at another.

 

 

Special Awards winning

Some competitions also present judges' choice or other special awards. These awards are usually given without regard to final score. The topics of these awards (e.g., Best Costume, Best Choreography, and Most Original) are often determined by the judge who issues them, although some competitions have fixed, standard topics for special awards.

© 2009- 2018 by  ECDC

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